wheeler trigger pull scale accuracy

ccssid

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Nov 1, 2018
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I have always been curious as to the accuracy of the Wheeler Trigger Pull Scale. (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004E4CZE2/?tag=1911fans-20)
I took an empty milk carton, filled it approx half way to get 4# total weight as per my digital postal scale (assuming this scale is reasonably accurate, of course). Attaching a string to the milk carton handle, I gently lifted it off the counter with the wheeler. The wheeler gave me a reading of 4# 3oz. Did it again at approx 3# 8oz of water and wheeler came in at approx. 3# 10oz.
So, the wheeler is measuring approx 2-3 ounces more than my actual trigger pull weight on my pistols. I guess this makes for an instant trigger job !!!!
Has anyone else double checked their Wheeler Trigger Pull Scale ?
 

busykngt

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I’ve got a Wheeler Trigger Gauge and a very old mechanical spring scale - which kinda remains to be seen how accurate it is. But maybe I can check it by weighing some grocery products that have their weights on the label and see how the reading compares (assuming very light weight packaging). And then I’ll check Wheeler gauge. You got my curiosity up! [I’ll post my results]

Typically when I use the trigger gauge, I’ll take about a dozen readings and then throw out the high and low readings and average the rest of the readings.
 
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fieldgrade

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I’ve used a Wheeler for several years and it seems to be consistent, as long as I take multiple samples and average them. In the interest of science I decided to check it out. This was probably the most unscientific experiment ever, as I was using a 40 year old adjustable spring postal scale as my point of reference.

Apparently the four pounds, six ounces measured on the postal scale equates to 4.5 lbs on the Wheeler trigger gauge. So if the postal scale is anywhere near accurate then I'm within 2 ounces on the trigger gauge, which I am fine with. Nearly 90% of my "smithing" is done on pistols, and I prefer 4-4.5 lbs. generally speaking, so I am good with that.

EDIT- I fixed a wildly erroneous typo above.
 
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Krunchnik

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I have a Lyman Digital and am wondering how a person checks for accuracy- and if it is not- how would the scale be recalibrated
 

woodlands747

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I use this one. It has been very reliable and I have verified the readings with a local smith’s Lyman digital. It is similar to the Wheeler and assume being from a trigger maker it would be a quality product.
 

pistolpete

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Jun 9, 2018
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I have one, it's accurate enough for a 20.00 scale. I'm not surprised it's a couple ounces off.
 

busykngt

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Jun 29, 2018
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Location
Metroplex, TX
Finally got my Wheeler Trigger Gauge measured against some accurate scales. My Wheeler Trigger Gauge is on the order of seven or eight years old. It appears in the three pound to five pound trigger pull weight range, the Wheeler gauge tends to measure just a little over two ounces heavy. (Measures roughly one-tenth of a pound heavier than the real weight, on average). Personally, I consider this negligible - I’m good with knowing the trigger pull weight within a quarter pound or so. Some of that will change {slightly} anyway, the more the firearm is shot and the springs increase the count of their compression cycles.

[ETA]: After re-reading the OP’s post, seems like my results were basically similar to his. I checked weights every quarter pound between three and five pounds (inclusive). At 3.5 pounds, I got the identically same results as his - my Wheeler Gauge registered 3# - 10oz.
 
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