What's your favorite hot sauce?

So I have my everyday sauces for basic flavor.
IMG_2527.jpeg


Then we move into some new ones, that people give me or I pick up along a drive.

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I find myself leaning towards dry spics.
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however, my favorite hot sauce is shown here. it's made about 30 minutes away, and I talk with the owner as he's a one-man band at the farmer's market.

Mythical Inferno - he has a hotter version that he just came out with, but when I tried it instantly my ears started pounding. so i just stick with the award winning sauce.

IMG_2529.jpeg
 
So I have my everyday sauces for basic flavor.
View attachment 35919


Then we move into some new ones, that people give me or I pick up along a drive.

View attachment 35920

I find myself leaning towards dry spics.
View attachment 35921


however, my favorite hot sauce is shown here. it's made about 30 minutes away, and I talk with the owner as he's a one-man band at the farmer's market.

Mythical Inferno - he has a hotter version that he just came out with, but when I tried it instantly my ears started pounding. so i just stick with the award winning sauce.

View attachment 35922
Good choices so far.
Have you tried Woodstock hot sauces from Costa Rica.

 
I was raised on Tabasco. We had little tiny bottles of it in our C-rations in Vietnam. It was the only thing to make that swill palatable.
Mid-70's, noticed the liquid was not as red and took a whole lot more drops to bring on the desired heat level in the food. Ok, just add more. Tabasco is for breakfast food and Franks is pretty much the everyday hot sauce on lunch and dinner foods.
Tabasco jalapeño on meat loaf and meatballs or Mexican food.
So, about three years ago, we toured the Tabasco facility on Avery Island, Louisiana. When visiting the Company Store where they have memorabilia and branded products to buy. There is also a tasting counter where they put each hot sauce, they make on a little ice cream for one to taste. Had no Idea they made 8 different varieties. I like the hot stuff, but the habanero was blistering hot. Even with ice cream.
So, asked the lady about my observations from the 70's. She said in 1973 they changed the recipe. Validated my concerns.
She also said the original recipe is still available only through the Company store and it isn't cheap. $25 a bottle, called the family reserve. That taste brought back a lot of memories.
As you enter the store, your asked if you're a veteran. If so, you're given some of the same tiny bottles we got in our rations back in the day with your branch of services logo on the bottle.
Tabasco has a huge history of supporting Veterans as the people that built that business had an amazing military history of their own.
One of my friends was a Marine, so I got a couple for him.
The family reserve is available on Amazon through that store on the grounds of the factory.
 
I was raised on Tabasco. We had little tiny bottles of it in our C-rations in Vietnam.
ME 2 LOL. ;)

My fondest memories of Tabasco is how it could hide much of that Surplus Crap from what was in those OD cans.
Tabasco was everywhere, brats kept little bottles to use on fresh oysters we harvested from off the reef.

I was very lucky our Dad hated GI food & would take us to the Mecardos to buy fresh local foods. No matter what country
we were in, my Mom would learn to cook with local foods. I started very early eating exotic fruits & vegetables, like every
color & flavor pepper hot & sweet.

To this day I just can't down a Raw oyster without Tabasco sauce. It just don't seem natural without it.



 
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I enjoyed the family reserve. It's aged longer, I think which gives it more flavor? $15 on amazon, so not totally unreasonable.
There is a huge warehouse of wood casks containing the brew. You're not allowed to go downwind of the warehouse, being directed to the upwind side where there are huge fans to move the odor away from the public.
As I understand it, the sauce leaches through the barrels during the aging process similar to what aging bourbon does when it's sent to the warehouses to age. Depending on how long it's aged, determines how much product is left in the cask.
 
As I understand it, the sauce leaches through the barrels during the aging process similar to what aging bourbon does when it's sent to the warehouses to age


WHAT IS THE ANGEL'S SHARE?
The angel's share is the whiskey lost to evaporation during the aging process. It's an inevitable part of making whiskey.

This whiskey that evaporates into the air and perfumes the storehouse was dubbed the angel's share in medieval Ireland and Scotland. They believed the whiskey that disappeared into the air was meant as an offering for the angels.
 

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